Distributed Chaos

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humanoidhistory:

Fish-eye view of a space shuttle cockpit simulator, January 1999. (NASA)

humanoidhistory:

Fish-eye view of a space shuttle cockpit simulator, January 1999. (NASA)

just—space:

Gorgeous time-lapse picture during the 2010 Equinox with the Sun directly overhead. The equatorial location(Ecuador) allows the photographer to show both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres of the sky together. [2000×1028]

just—space:

Gorgeous time-lapse picture during the 2010 Equinox with the Sun directly overhead. The equatorial location(Ecuador) allows the photographer to show both the Northern and Southern Hemispheres of the sky together. [2000×1028]

Space is so vast, yet,

All that void could never drown,

The pain I am now.

bourbonface:

Did anyone else’s head just explode?

bourbonface:

Did anyone else’s head just explode?

May 3
acidfaerie-25:

What’s Behind by Rozrr·۰•○●☮●○•۰·

acidfaerie-25:

What’s Behind by Rozrr

·۰•○●☮●○•۰·

May 3
phillipstearns:

Personal Space

phillipstearns:

Personal Space

May 3

rhamphotheca:

The Universe and Assymetry

SYMMETRY is deeply satisfying. It has harmony and balance – it feels right. But while physicists use it as a guide in building theories, nature is more often lopsided than manifestly symmetric. Asymmetries are often far more informative. Trying to understand why a particular asymmetry exists can reveal clues about the profound nature of reality.

That’s exactly what Peter Higgs and François Englert were doing 50 years ago when they came up with what’s now known as the Higgs mechanism, which imparts mass to fundamental particles. In October last year, their efforts were rewarded when they shared the Nobel prize in physics.

(via: New Scientist)

May 3

In elementary and middle school, we hide math’s great masterpieces from students’ view. The arithmetic, algebraic equations and geometric proofs we do teach are important, but they are to mathematics what whitewashing a fence is to Picasso — so reductive it’s almost a lie.

- UC Berkeley’s (via ucresearch)

May 3
May 3

I like mathematics because it is not human and has nothing particular to do with this planet or with the whole accidental universe – because, like Spinoza’s God, it won’t love us in return.

- Bertrand Russell (via drakontomalloi)